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College of Arts and Sciences

College of Arts and Sciences

Matthew Palmtag

Instructor II
Phone: (239) 590-1263
E-Mail: mpalmtag@fgcu.edu
Office: WH 229

Education

  • M.S in Marine Science from The University of Texas at Austin Marine Science Institute, 2000 – 2004
  • B.S. in Biology from Texas A&M University – Corpus Christi, TX, 1995 - 2000

Teaching

Areas of interest include Animal Nutrition, Fish Biology, Aquaculture, and introductory Biology courses for majors.

Current Courses

  • ANS 3440 Animal Nutrition, Annually (fall)
  • BSC 1010C General Biology I, Annually (fall and spring)

Research

As an Instructor at FGCU my responsibilities focus entirely on teaching, service, and the scholarship of teaching and learning. With that being said, I have over a decade of experience as a student and professional researcher in the field of aquaculture, specifically marine ornamental aquaculture. Many of the practices used to capture wild marine ornamental organisms for the marine ornamental trade have been shown to result in significant coral reef habitat destruction. The focus of my work has been to develop methods to breed popular marine ornamental species in captivity, produce commercially viable rearing protocols, and thus provide a sustainable alternative to species collected through destructive practices. Production of commercially viable rearing protocols are often gained through application of the scientific method to engage nutritional bottlenecks presented in the captive rearing of these species. The bottlenecks most often occur at the complex larval stages of these species. My experiences in marine ornamental larval nutrition research, continuous thirst for knowledge, and my commitment to the scholarship of teaching and learning are what fuel and inform my performance in the classroom.

Selected Scholarly Works

  • Palmtag, M.R. and Croshaw, D.A. 2013. Unlocking the Secrets of Sex Biased Inheritance Patterns, In: Laboratory Activities for General Biology I. Editors: Cross, R. and Jackson, B. Florida Gulf Coast University. Blue Door Publishing.
  • Palmtag, M.R. and G.J. Holt. 2007. Experimental studies to improve the larval survival of the fire shrimp (Lysmata debelius) to the juvenile stage. Journal of the World Aquaculture Society 38: 102 - 113.
  • Palmtag, M.R., C.K. Faulk, and G.J. Holt. 2006. Highly unsaturated fatty acid composition of rotifers (Brachionus plicatilus) and Artemia fed various enrichments. Journal of the World Aquaculture Society 37: 126- 131.
  • Palmtag, M.R. and G.J. Holt. 2001. Captive rearing of fire shrimp (Lysmata debelius). Texas A&M College Program Research Report. Texas Sea Grant.