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Department of Marine and Ecological Sciences

Department of Marine and Ecological Sciences

Felix Jose

Assistant Professor and Program Leader for Marine Science
Phone: (239) 590-1879
E-Mail: fjose@fgcu.edu
Office: SH 428

Felix Jose joined the Marine Science faculty at Florida Gulf Coast University in the Fall of 2011. His fields of interest are coastal circulation modeling, waves and sediment transport. After completing his doctoral degree at Cochin University of Science & Technology, India, a study of the hydrodynamics and heavy sand transport along south west coast of India, he continued as a Research Associate at Coastal Studies Institute, Louisiana State University. There he implemented an extended wave forecasting model for the Gulf of Mexico using MIKE 21.

http://www.wavcis.lsu.edu/forecasts/forecasts.asp?modelspec=mike21

Also his work involved studying the environmental effects of future sand mining from transgressive sand shoals off the Louisiana coast. With funding support from BOEM (Department of Interior) and Louisiana Department of Natural Resources, his group engaged in comprehensive field deployments and modeling studies to quantify the physical and geomorphological implications of large scale mining from offshore sand shoals, viz., Ship Shoal, Sabine Bank, Tiger and Trinity Shoals. His work also involved natural resources damage assessment from the landfall of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, by simulating the storm surge and the stranding of salt water in low lying marsh, with the help of ADCIRC circulation model. Other research interest includes coastal sediment transport modeling and its implications on beach morphodynamics. Currently, he is developing a hydrodynamic model for the Atchafalaya Bay, Louisiana to support an oyster restoration project, being implemented for the Bay. Dr. Jose teaches classes in Physical Oceanography and Marine Systems and a new course on Coastal Morphodynamics is proposed.

Click here to view CV.