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Center for Environmental and Sustainability Education

2013 Archives

 
 

 A Cruise to Remember with Poet Richard Blanco

 

The Center for Environmental and Sustainability Education hosted a successful fundraising event on Sunday, November 10, 2013 aboard the Lady Chadwick of Captiva Cruises. The event themed, “Looking for The Gulf Motel: A Luncheon Cruise with Richard Blanco,” was filled with meaningful remarks, poetry, and a book signing as it cruised the inshore waters near Captiva.

The Center would like to thank hosts Susan Stuart and Paul McCarthy, as well as South Seas Island Resort and McCarthy’s Marina for their generosity and support. The cruise offered an intimate and relaxed atmosphere where guests could mingle with the distinguished 2013 Presidential Inaugural Poet, Richard Blanco, and one another.

Center Director, Peter Blaze Corcoran opened up the afternoon with remarks about the Center and its history of inviting celebrated writers to share their work with Southwest Florida. Dr. Kris De Welde, Director of Education and Associate Professor of Sociology at FGCU, and Center Senior Faculty Associate introduced Richard Blanco and shared her story of identity and place as a Cuban-American.  De Welde said, “His poetry connects strongly to the work we do at the Center, work that explores our connections to place – our physical place, our place in the communities we inhabit, and our place in a complex and rapidly changing world.”

Blanco’s readings touched everyone aboard the Lady Chadwick. He delves into each of his poems with extreme passion and brings his words to life for the listeners, a true artistic triumph. The setting of the event enhanced the themes of Blanco’s Poetry. Sweeping panoramas of mangroves and the tranquil waters off of Captiva offered guests a view that tied into Blanco’s themes of place and added to the vivid imagery in his poems. His volume, Looking for The Gulf Motel (2012), evokes a vanishing Florida that we love, a place of ecological memories being erased. “I want to turn the golf courses back into mangroves,” he writes.

The Center greatly appreciates the support it received from the Southwest Florida community, FGCU Faculty, and our gracious hosts towards making the fundraiser a success. Such support allows the Center to continue its efforts to realize the dream of a sustainable future thorough scholarship, education, and action.


 

Looking for the Gulf Motel:
A Luncheon Cruise with Poet Richard Blanco

 

The Center for Environmental and Sustainability Education will be hosting a Luncheon Cruise with 2013 presidential inaugural poet Richard Blanco aboard the Lady Chadwick of Captiva Cruises. The cruise will be departing from McCarthy’s Marina on Sunday, November 10, 2013 from 12:00-2:00p.m. Guests will enjoy poems, remarks, and a book signing with the distinguished Cuban American Poet as we cruise into the Gulf of Mexico.

The Center for Environmental and Sustainability Education has a tradition of inviting celebrated writers to share their work with Southwest Florida, including the award winning poets Allison Hawthorne Deming, Homero Aridjis, and Mary Oliver.

Richard Blanco is a builder of poems as well as cities. He holds a Bachelors of Science in Civil Engineering and Masters in Fine Arts in Creative Writing from Florida International University. By day he is a professional civil engineer, and by night an award winning poet. The Center values Blanco’s poetry for its invocation of spirit and place, and of both natural and constructed environments. We cherish the interdisciplinary nature of his work which draws, in its construction, on his study of the science of civil engineering and of the humanities. His work is full of social and cultural awareness and of the diversity in American life. His volume, Looking for The Gulf Motel (2012), evokes a vanishing Florida that we love, a place of ecological memories being erased. “I want to turn the golf courses back into mangroves,” he writes.

Earlier this year Blanco was selected by President Obama to be the inaugural poet for his reelection. On January 21, 2013, Blanco had the honor of reading his poem “One Today,” at the inauguration ceremony, marking him as the fifth inaugural poet in history. He is also the nation's youngest Inaugural Poet, as well as the first to be an immigrant and openly gay. President Obama said in a statement, "It is an honor to have Richard Blanco in our second inauguration. His contributions to the fields of poetry and art have paved the way for future generations of writers. Richard's work is well-suited for an opening that will celebrate the strength and diversity of our great country."

Richard Blanco’s acclaimed first book, City of a Hundred Fires, explores the yearnings and negotiation of cultural identity as a Cuban-American and received the prestigious Agnes Starrett Poetry Prize. His second book, Directions to The Beach of the Dead won the PEN American Beyond Margins Award for its continued exploration of the universal themes of place and homecoming. His third collection, Looking for The Gulf Motel, won the Patterson Poetry Prize and Thom Gunn Award from the Publishing Triangle. His work has appeared in The Best American Poetry 2000, Great American Prose Poems, Breadloaf Anthology of New American Poets, and American Poetry: The Next Generation.

The Sunset Cruise will take place on Sunday, November 10, 2013 and will be from 12:00-2:00 p.m. aboard the Lady Chadwick, leaving From McCarthy’s Marina 11401 Andy Rosse Lane, Captiva Island. For more information on the event please contact the Center for Environmental and Sustainability Education at (239) 590-7166 or e-mail us at cese@fgcu.edu/cese.

 


 Corcoran and Orr Deliver Keynote at WEEC 7

 

Center Director Peter Blaze Corcoran and Board Co-chair David W. Orr  delivered a keynote address at the Seventh World Environmental Education Congress on Tuesday, June 11, 2013, in Marrakech, Morocco. You can find a short handout with key information from the talk here.

Entitled, “Imagination, Resilience, and Will: Educational Challenges in a Warming World,” the address will focus on how teachers and students can maintain their morale and spirit under conditions of climate stresses.

Center Editorial Associate Brandon Hollingshead also attended the conference, and took the lead on a conference side-event to advance the Center's informal network of university centers in environmental and sustainability education.


Haffenreffer Challenge Met!

 

Thanks to its many supporters, the Center for Environmental and Sustainability Education at Florida Gulf Coast University has succeeded in meeting the “Haffenreffer Challenge.” Peter and Mallory Haffenreffer renewed their annual tradition of matching any donation made to the Center up to a total of twelve thousand dollars. The Challenge was issued in February during the Center’s Ninth Annual Fundraising Celebration at the Haffenreffer’s beautiful Sanibel Island home. The celebration welcomed many prestigious guests from around the country, who enjoyed live music, hor d'oeuvres, and remarks from the Center’s Board of Advisors.

As part of the Rachel Carson Distinguished Lecture Weekend, attendees of the party with a purpose contributed funds to support the Center’s mission. Proceeds of the weekend events benefit scholarly publications, student employment and research, and ongoing educational events.

The Center is actively supporting environmental and sustainability education projects by issuing mini-grants to FGCU students, faculty, and staff.  These grants give special attention to educational and community based projects that incorporate the Earth Charter and that share similar goals with the Center.

FGCU students Tamara Edwards and Lindsay Leban working on their SAGE Mini-grant project.

Currently the Center is working on an international network of research centers involved in the scholarship of education for sustainable development. The Center has taken a leadership role in the creation of the network which will serve as a creative and innovative space to strengthen the task of mainstreaming sustainability in higher education institutions. It will work to promote international and intergenerational collaboration, connect innovation hubs on campuses, and serve as a platform for the exchange of ideas.

Looking ahead, the Center is already busy making preparations for next year’s Rachel Carson Distinguished Lecture weekend which will be February 21-22, 2014. In addition to the lecture, the ambitious weekend will also include the Center’s tenth Annual Fundraising Celebration.

The Center extends its gratitude to all those who contributed toward the Center’s best fundraising season ever! Contributions from the Southwest Florida community allow the Center to continue its “work toward realizing the dream of a sustainable and peaceful future for earth through scholarship, education and action.” For more information about the Center for Environmental and Sustainability Education please contact us at 239-590-7166 or at cese@fgcu.edu.

 


 

Center Director Awarded Fulbright Fellowship

 

Center Director, Peter Blaze Corcoran, will be traveling to Africa next year as a visiting professor at the University of Nairobi through the prestigious Fulbright Scholar Program. Corcoran will join the distinguished company of past American scholars to have received the highly-competitive award.

For many, a Fulbright award represents the chance to realize one’s dreams and gives both students and educators the rare opportunity to travel abroad to work on a research project of their direction. Corcoran’s Fulbright will bring him to Kenya to advance the legacy of the late Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, Wangari Muta Maathai, through his work at the Wangari Maathai Institute for Peace and Environmental Studies. In addition to educational lectures and seminars on sustainability in higher education, Corcoran’s scholarly contributions over his ten-month residency will include research and curriculum development with the ultimate goal of developing a comprehensive educational program for the Institute.

Corcoran’s fellowship will allow him to continue Maathai’s meaningful work while also establishing an invaluable foundation for international collaboration between FGCU and institutions of higher education in Africa. 

Additionally, Corcoran will work with the United Nations Environment Programme to develop an informal, international, and intergenerational research network to strengthen sustainability in higher education. The network will promote research on scholarly centers in institutionalizing strong sustainability in higher education as well as encourage intergenerational collaboration with students and young scholars.

Maathai was not only a friend to Corcoran, but also a colleague who graciously agreed to serve as the Center’s Distinguished International Advisor and guided the Center on its strategic planning process shortly before her passing in 2011. “The award is a great honor but also a privilege and an opportunity to advance Wangari Maathai’s legacy,” said Corcoran. The news comes as an honor not only for Corcoran but also communally for Florida Gulf Coast University.

 


 

Earth Charter Mini-Grants Fund Art and Education at Home and Abroad

While some Florida Gulf Coast University Students enjoyed art on campus, others ventured to South America to show children how to create their own with help from the Center. A two-week study abroad program and an international art show were among 10 projects funded through Earth Charter Mini-grants from 2012-2013.

The Earth Charter is an international framework with guiding principles for pursuing a just, sustainable, and peaceful world. Earth Charter Mini-Grants are awarded each year to projects that advance the Center’s mission through innovative educational research methods, emergent eco-pedagogies, and educational philosophy and practice based on ethics of care and sustainability.

A mini-grant helped fund the travel and lodging for two FGCU art professors and ten art, anthropology or computer science majors to visit the little-known South American country of Guyana to explore the environment, culture, history, and people through a study abroad program. The main focus was on the

development of village-based ecotourism in the remote Macushi Indian villages of the Rupununi region, but the highlight of the trip was an extended stay in the village of Yupukari where students learned from the essential life skills of the Macushi people. They offered their own energies teaching arts and crafts classes for the staff and students of the Yupukari Primary School and documented their experience through photos and blog posts at http://clubs.fgcu.edu/studyabroadguyana/index.htm.  

Back row, from left: art professors Mary Voytek and Patricia Fay, Kendry Vasquez, Chris Steiner, Meagan Shaw, Knoel Blake, Michelle Manta, Cydney Chasky, and Cam DeMay. Front row: Kel Campbell, Maria Jijon, and Lauren Sinett

In her post, student Cydney Chasky admitted she did not know where Guyana was beforehand but now feels more connected to it and the other unknown areas after her trip. “People around the world think that ‘having more’, as in ‘stuff’ makes life better. In reality, within these wonderful villages like Iwokrama, Surama, Toka, Katoka, Karanambu, and Yupukari, the people ‘have more’ understanding of happiness, their surroundings, and essentials in life,” she wrote. “This trip has given me a new perspective on what’s out there in this great big world, and has given me an understanding of myself I did not have prior. I re-connected, both internally and externally.” Michelle Manta had a similar experience. “I understand more how much we as humans are connected with nature and made up of the Earth. This is something we tend to forget in our culture,” she wrote.

To help with ecotourism in the area, the group’s intention was to develop a marketable ceramic product design to share with potters and artisans in rural Guyana. Clay whistles (one note) and ocarinas (multiple notes) were developed by the indigenous peoples of Central and South America, but are not currently being produced by potters in the Rupununi region of Guyana. Plaster models for the molds were created beforehand on campus in the shape of a turtle, a fish, a frog, an alligator, and Guyana’s native capybara, and they were a hit with local students.

A five-session arts camp was held for 166 village children at the elementary school level and included developing projects and exercises that can be repeated and integrated into the primary school curriculum. Special emphasis was placed on native images, such as flowers, animals, fish, and the Guyanese flag, and projects included leaf printing, paper dolls, origami fish, paper mosaic and a large fabric mural. Students and faculty experimented with local materials, and product design to contribute to existing efforts in craft development. FGCU students Cam DeMay and Meaghan Shaw were teamed up with 12-13-year-olds and felt everyone was nervous at the start, but that quickly washed away. “The children, though shy and reserved to our new faces, immediately caught on to our projects and were really proud of the art they were creating,” wrote DeMay.

 

There had been eight weeks of extensive preparation before students began their trip in the capital of Georgetown, moved west through the rainforest and into the savannahs and riverways of Macushi Indian country.  Their journey included trips to the Karanambu Ranch with its rehabilitation program for giant wild river otters, and to Kaieteur Falls, the longest single-drop waterfall in the world. When the students returned, they shared what they learned and experienced in Guyana through a public program for the university and regional community, and through the presentation of research and service projects at the FGCU Research Day in April with examples of their art.



Maria Jijon was overwhelmed with how everyone they met opened their hearts to share and teach their love of nature, their own culture and simplicity of life, something she had lost in her busy life. “I never thought I could feel so at home in another country,” she wrote, “but I can say today that I am part of this amazing planet Earth that has so much more to offer than what I ever thought.”

 

While in Guyana, students and faculty visited Kaieteur Falls, the longest single-drop waterfall in the world.

 

At home, the recent work of artist Cesar Cornejo was partially funded through a mini-grant because the artist’s work focuses intensely on integrating social elements into sculpture and painting as a means of communication. The recent Peruvian-based art exhibit “Puno MoCA” educated people about Puno Peru, an Andean Mountain Village that was described as a forgotten town with basic infrastructure, limited resources, and extreme temperatures that commonly cause malnutrition and poor living conditions for children and their families.

The art project was a worthy recipient of the Earth Charter Mini- Grant because it aimed to revitalize the community, improve living conditions and generate opportunities for financial growth and development in the region through an interactive museum model.

More than $14,000 has been awarded to recipients over the past three years. Recent projects have included presentations and curriculum improvements in environmental art, literacy, and education, as well as civil and engineering courses, green chemistry, and green building. Contributions to the Center help further research and educational programs for a variety of mini-grants and other scholarly endeavors both at home and abroad.


 

Haffenreffer Challenge Matches Gifts to Center

 

What may appear as a traditional soirée by the beach on Sanibel Island, holds a higher purpose for community supporters, Florida Gulf Coast University students and faculty who benefit from the opportunities provided by the Center for Environmental and Sustainability Education throughout the year. Mallory and Peter Haffenreffer, the Sanibel residents who hosted the Center’s Ninth Annual Fundraising Celebration at their beachfront residence on Saturday, February 9, 2013, have graciously renewed their Haffenreffer Challenge, which will match gifts to the Center up to a total of $12,000.

As part of the Rachel Carson Distinguished Lecture Weekend, attendees of the party with a purpose contributed funds to support the Center’s mission. Proceeds of the weekend events benefit scholarly publications, student employment and research, and ongoing educational events.

At the Fundraising Celebration, poet Alison Hawthorne Deming made an appeal for gifts to be matched through the Haffenrefffer Challenge and concluded with her metaphorical poem, “Mosquitoes”. It spoke of the small sacrifices people make for “selfless service to their future” and aimed to show guests that their contributions help Center members realize their dreams and create a better future for both thelocal and global community. Deming's poem can be viewed below.

 Leslie Gregory played harp inside the Haffenreffer’s home while harpist Julia Lane and violinist Fred Gosbee shared their lovely music on the beach. Center Board Co-chairs, Mary Evelyn Tucker and David Orr made brief remarks just after sunset and the Haffenreffer Challenge was announced. Tucker provided the cosmological context for the Center’s work by drawing attention to the larger story of the universe, which is the subject of her 2012 Emmy Award Winning film, Journey of the Universe. Well-known as a leading authority on climate change, Orr suggested the question is not “if” but “when” the disastrous effects will be felt and insisted that we all have a moral obligation to be stewards of the planet. His sobering talk stressed the need for action and suggested that it is future generations that will suffer the consequences of our actions now.

The Fundraising Celebration followed the Center’s annual Rachel Carson Distinguished Lecture, which was a poetry reading by beloved poet Mary Oliver, Friday, February 8, 2013. Nearly 400 people attended the annual event at St. Michael & All Angels Episcopal Church, with overflow seating in the Parish Hall and many at the jumbo screen outdoors under the stars.

For more information on matching contributions to the Center, please call Director Peter Blaze Corcoran at (239) 590-7166 or email us at cese@fgcu.edu.

 

 

 

Mosquitoes

by Alison Hawthorne Deming

 

First came the scouts who felt our sweat in the air

and understood our need to make a sacrifice.

We were so large and burdened with all we had carried,

our blood too rich for our own good. They understood

that we could give what they needed and never miss it.

Then came the throng encircling our heads like acoustic haloes

droning with the me-me-me of appetite. We understood

their pleasure to find such hairless beasts so easy to open and drink.

We understood their female ardor to breed and how little

they had to go on considering the protein required to make

their million-fold eggs. Vibrant, available, and hot,

we gave our flesh in selfless service to their future.

 

--American Scientist, Poetry on the Bookshelf, May-June 2012

 
   

 


 

Center Hosts Successful Rachel Carson Distinguished Lecture Weekend!

 

Anticipation, awe, and wonder filled the air as beloved poet Mary Oliver prepared to deliver the Center for Environmental and Sustainability Education’s Rachel Carson Distinguished Lecture. Nearly 400 people were in attendance in the pews at St. Michael and All Angels Church, in the overflow seating in the parish hall, and at the jumbo screen outdoors under the stars. Center Director Peter Blaze Corcoran observed that no matter where people were, they were engrossed in the reading. “It was wonderful to see that poetry lives!,” he said.

Along with the public, Florida Gulf Coast University students, Center supporters, members of the Board of Advisors, and Center staff absorbed Oliver’s descriptive connections to the natural world, which were sometimes personal and at other times universal, inquisitive, and inspiring. The annual event seeks to engage the public in discussions on sustainability, ethics, democracy and literature with scholars and public intellectuals. Oliver was invited to speak because her lyrical poetry has inspired a deep appreciation for the wildness and beauty of nature. Her poems included those from her recent publication, A Thousand Mornings, and others from forthcoming publications.

At the Lecture, FGCU President Wilson Bradshaw presented Mary Oliver with the Rachel Carson Award. The Center gives its highest award, in the form of a conch shell, to a recipient who embodies Rachel Carson’s contributions most relevant to the Center- public policy based on sound science and ethics, active participation of an ecologically-literate citizenry, and appreciation of the natural world through the literary arts and environmental education.

The following evening was full of food, fun, and fundraising to support the Center’s mission. Harpists and a violinist created a magical scene for guests to mingle and share ideas with one another at the beachfront home of the Peter and Mallory Haffenreffer. Gifts to the Center are being matched by the Haffenreffers up to a total of $12,000.

Renowned poet Alison Hawthorne Deming and Center Co-chairs Mary Evelyn Tucker and David Orr made brief remarks just after sunset and announced the “Haffenreffer Challenge. Proceeds of the Rachel Carson Distinguished Lecture Weekend fund scholarly publications, student employment, and ongoing educational events.

For more information on matching contributions to the Center, please call Director Peter Blaze Corcoran at (239) 590-7166 or email us at cese@fgcu.edu.

 


 

Thank you for your generous support!

The Rachel Carson Distinguished Lecture on Friday, February 8, 2013 is fully subscribed for reserved contributor seating. We have reserved the remaining seats for the public and FGCU students.  These will be available at a first come, first served basis from 5:00pm on the day of the Lecture. 

We are now reserving seats in the Parish Hall for a direct video feed of the Lecture for contributors if desired.  We expect there will also be free seating in the Parish Hall for the public. This will be available on a first come, first served basis.  Please feel free to call or e-mail us if you have questions.

The Ninth Annual Fundraising Celebration on Saturday, February 9, 2013 is also fully subscribed.  We are happy to take names for a waiting list as we do expect cancellations.  Please contact the Center for further information at cese@fgcu.edu or at 239-590-7166.


 

The Latest Details on the Rachel Carson Distinguished Lecture Weekend February 8-9, 2013
Featuring Mary Oliver

The Center for Environmental and Sustainability Education is working hard to prepare for its Annual Rachel Carson Distinguished Lecture Weekend! The poetry of Mary Oliver will bring local and national environmental educators under one roof in February. The renowned poet will deliver a reading of her work as the Rachel Carson Distinguished Lecture on Friday, February 8, 2013 at 7:30 PM at St. Michael & All Angels Church.

The annual event seeks to engage the public in discussions on sustainability, ethics, democracy and literature with literary scholars and other intellectuals from home and abroad. Center Board of Advisors Mary Evelyn Tucker and David W. Orr, and FGCU President Wilson Bradshaw will share a pew with fellow literary enthusiasts, and other academics who promote the Center’s mission, to enjoy an evening of awe and wonder. 

The Lecture is free and open to the public, but seats will be reserved for contributors to the Center’s Ninth Annual Fundraising Celebration.

Tickets will be distributed the day of the Lecture on the porch of St. Michael & All Angels Church.

For free, non-reserved seating, tickets will be available at 5:00 PM on a first come, first served basis.

For contributors with reserved seats, tickets will be available for pick up anytime from 5:00 PM to 7:30 PM.

The doors will open for all ticket holders at 6:45 PM.

At 7:30 PM any tickets not picked up will be distributed to others. 

The Ninth Annual Fundraising Celebration will take place on Saturday, February 9, 2013 from 5:00 to 8:00 PM. at the Sanibel Island beachfront home of Peter and Mallory Haffenreffer. This is the Center’s major fundraising event of the year and proceeds help advance the mission to work toward realizing the dream of a sustainable and peaceful future for Earth through scholarship, education, and action. Funds raised by the Center will be allocated to its many initiatives, including grant programs for faculty and students, educational events, and employment opportunities for students.

Invitations for the Rachel Carson Distinguished Lecture Weekend were mailed in early January. If you would like an invitation or would like to be added to the Center’s mailing list please contact the Center by email at cese@fgcu.edu or by phone at 239-590-7166.


 

Center to Host Pulitzer Prize Winner for Rachel Carson Distinguished Lecture!

Mary Oliver. Photo by Rob Howard

                             Mary Oliver. Photo by Rob Howard

The Center for Environmental and Sustainability Education is excited to announce that Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award recipient Mary Oliver will deliver a poetry reading with commentary for the 2013 Rachel Carson Distinguished Lecture. Last year’s Lecture was cancelled due to Oliver’s serious illness but she has recovered and will be reading from her collections of poetry, which will include her most recent edition, A Thousand Mornings (2012), on Friday, February 8, 2013. The Lecture Weekend on Sanibel Island will also include our Ninth Annual Fundraising Celebration on Saturday, February 9, 2013.

Mary Oliver is widely recognized for her lyrical poems that use vivid imagery to portray the natural world and she has been chosen as the Lecturer because her poetry renders the gravity, grace, and beauty of the ordinary world. Much like Rachel Carson's unparalleled contributions to human understanding of our environment, Mary Oliver's work has inspired deep appreciation for the wildness and beauty of nature.

The Rachel Carson Distinguished Lecture is a signature event of the Center that brings public intellectuals to Southwest Florida to discuss issues such as sustainability, ethics, democracy, and literature. Past Lecturers include Steven C. Rockefeller, Terry Tempest Williams, Mary Evelyn Tucker, David Orr, and Homero Aridjis. Rachel Carson was celebrated for her scientific revelations regarding the environment, with literary artistry that permeated her texts, and her work is the inspiration for the Center. Engagement with the natural world fosters reciprocity and care for the beauty and bounty of Earth. This concept is at the heart of the Center’s mission of working “toward realizing the dream of a sustainable and peaceful future for Earth through scholarship, education, and action.”

The Lecture will be held on Friday, February 8, 2013 at 7:30 p.m. at Saint Michael and All Angels Church on Sanibel Island. The Lecture is free and open to the public, but seats will be reserved for contributors to the Fundraising Celebration. For more information on this year's Lecture, Mary Oliver, or past Lectures, please visit our Rachel Carson Distinguished Lecture Series page.

The Ninth Annual Fundraising Celebration will occur the following evening, Saturday, February 9, 2013 from 5:00 to 8:00 p.m. at the Sanibel Island beachfront home of Peter and Mallory Haffenreffer. This is the major fundraising event for the Center and helps us to further our sustainability initiatives locally and globally.

For more information on these events or to request an invitation, please feel free to call Center Director Peter Blaze Corcoran at (239) 590-7166 or email cese@fgcu.edu.

Reserved Seating

The Lecture is free and open to the public but it is a ticketed event. Reserved seating will be provided to those who contribute to the Ninth Annual Fundraising Celebration. Tickets will be issued at the church on the night of the Lecture to non-contributors and to contributors. For more information or to request an invitation to the Lecture and Fundraising Celebration, please contact the Center by email at cese@fgcu.edu or by phone at (239)-590-7166.