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Office of Equity and Diversity

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Contact Information

Mr. Jimmy Myers
Director
239-590-7406

Maureen Jenny
Coordinator
239-590-1297

Linda Cento
Coordinator
239-590-7405

Office of Equity and Diversity
Florida Gulf Coast University
Ben Hill Griffin Hall, Suite 154
10501 FGCU Boulevard, South
Fort Myers, Florida 33965-6565

Phone: 239-590-1297 or TTY: 711
Fax: 239-590-7407

Frequently Asked Questions

 
 

SOURCE: U S DEPT OF JUSTICE: Civil Rights Division

What is Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964?

Who is responsible for enforcing Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964?

What is Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act?

Who is responsible for enforcing Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act?

What can an individual do if s/he believes that s/he has been discriminated against in employment in violation of Title VII?

What is the relationship between the EEOC and the U.S. Department of Justice?

Is there a time limit involved with respect to filing a charge of discrimination with the EEOC under Title VII?

If I have filed a charge with the EEOC and want a notice of right to sue, which agency will issue it to me?

I do not believe that the EEOC properly investigated my charge of discrimination, can the Department of Justice help me?

Who is responsible for handling employment discrimination complaints related to an individual's immigration or citizenship status?

What is the Age Discrimination In Employment Act?

What is Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964?

What is the Rehabilitation Act of 1973?

What is the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968?

What is the Vietnam Era Veterans' Readjustment Assistance Act of 1974?

What is the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act of 1994?

What is Executive Order 11246?


Q. What is Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964?

A. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, 42 U.S.C. §2000e, et seq., prohibits discrimination in employment on the basis of race, sex, national origin and religion. It also is unlawful under the Act for an employer to take retaliatory action against any individual for opposing employment practices made unlawful by Title VII or for filing a discrimination charge or for testifying or assisting or participating in an investigation, proceeding, or hearing under Title VII.

Q. Who is responsible for enforcing Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964?

A. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) enforces Title VII against private employers and the Employment Litigation Section, Civil Rights Division, U.S. Department of Justice enforces Title VII against state and local government employers. However, individuals who believe that they have been victims by any employer of discrimination prohibited by Title VII must file a charge of discrimination with the EEOC in order to protect their rights. The EEOC is responsible for investigating individual charges of discrimination alleging a violation of Title VII.

Q. What is Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act?

A. Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (the "ADA"), as amended, 42 U.S.C. §12111, et seq., prohibits discrimination in employment against a qualified individual with a disability because of the disability. It also is unlawful under the Act for an employer to take retaliatory action against any individual for opposing employment practices made unlawful by the ADA or for filing a discrimination charge or for testifying or assisting or participating in an investigation, proceeding, or hearing under the ADA. Title I of the ADA designates the EEOC as the federal agency primarily responsible for investigating individual charges of discrimination under the Act. If you believe that you have been discriminated against in employment in violation of the ADA, you should contact the EEOC. The Americans with Disabilities Act Home Page contains useful information about the entire ADA, as does the following number: 1-800-514-0301; 1-800-514-0383 (TDD).

Q. Who is responsible for enforcing Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act?

A. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) enforces Title I of the ADA against private employers and the Disability Rights Section, Civil Rights Division, U.S. Department of Justice enforces Title I of the ADA against state and local government employers. Title I of the ADA designates the EEOC as the federal agency primarily responsible for investigating individual charges of discrimination under the Act. If you believe that you have been discriminated against in employment by any employer in violation of the ADA, you should contact the EEOC. The Americans with Disabilities Act Home Page contains useful information about the entire ADA, as does the following number: 1-800-514-0301; 1-800-514-0383 (TDD)..

Q. What can an individual do if s/he believes that s/he has been discriminated against in employment in violation of Title VII?
A. That individual should contact the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) to find out whether s/he may file a charge. Congress has designated the EEOC as the federal agency responsible for investigating individual charges of discrimination under Title VII. Individuals who are federal employees, or applicants for employment with a federal agency, must file a charge with the equal opportunity office of the federal agency.

Q. What is the relationship between the EEOC and the U.S. Department of Justice?

A. If the EEOC, after investigating a charge of employment discrimination filed against a state or local government employer under Title VII, or the Americans with Disabilities Act determines that there is reasonable cause to believe a violation of the law has occurred and conciliation efforts are unsuccessful, the EEOC will then refer the charge to the Department of Justice. The Department of Justice will either initiate litigation on the charge or issue a notice of right to sue to the charging party, which entitles the charging party to file his or her own lawsuit in court.

Q. Is there a time limit involved with respect to filing a charge of discrimination with the EEOC under Title VII?

A. Yes. Title VII imposes time limits for the filing of charges of discrimination. The EEOC can provide you with further information on this subject. In most instances, a charge must be filed within 300 days of the act of discrimination. In some states the charge must be filed within 180 days of the act of discrimination.

Q. If I have filed a charge with the EEOC and want a notice of right to sue, which agency will issue it to me?

A. The Employment Litigation Section, through its right to sue unit, issues notices of right to sue requested by charging parties, upon receipt of appropriate documentation from the EEOC, on charges that have been filed with the EEOC against state and local government employers under Title VII and the Americans with Disabilities Act, except in those instances in which the EEOC has dismissed the charge. If the charge has been filed against a private employer or a union, only the EEOC has authority to issue a notice of right to sue. Also, only the EEOC has authority to issue a notice of right to sue under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, regardless of whether the respondent named in the charge is a state or local government employer or a private employer or a union. If you have filed a charge under Title VII or the Americans with Disabilities Act against a state or local government employer and want a notice of right to sue, you may make your request in writing either to the office of the EEOC where you filed the charge or to the Employment Litigation Section. Also see, more detailed answers to questions addressing notices of right to sue.

Q. I do not believe that the EEOC properly investigated my charge of discrimination, can the Department of Justice help me?

A. No. The Department of Justice is without authority to review the manner in which the EEOC conducts its investigations or to intervene before the EEOC on behalf of an individual. If you believe that the EEOC did not properly investigate your charge, you may wish to contact:
Director, Office of Field Management Programs
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
1801 L Street, NW, Room 8023
Washington, D.C. 20507

Q. Can the Department of Justice provide legal assistance to private citizens?

A. No. The Department of Justice is not authorized to provide legal assistance to private citizens or to represent them, except in instances where the Department of Justice has determined it will provide representation to a person who has filed a complaint with the Department of Labor ("DOL") under the Uniformed Services Employment & Reemployment Rights Act of 1994 and the complaint has been referred to us by DOL.

Q. Can the Department of Justice assist an individual with a discrimination complaint that the individual may have against a federal employer?

A. No. Congress has not given the Department of Justice authority to pursue charges of employment discrimination against departments or agencies of the federal government. The procedure for filing a charge of employment discrimination against a department or agency of the federal government is to contact an equal employment opportunity officer at that agency who is authorized to receive and investigate such a charge. The personnel office at the agency in question can provide you with further information about filing a charge of employment discrimination.

Q. Who is responsible for handling employment discrimination complaints related to an individual's immigration or citizenship? status?

A. The Department of Justice's Office of Special Counsel for Immigration Related Unfair Employment Practices (OSC) is responsible for investigating charges of job discrimination related to an individual's citizenship or immigration status and, in certain situations, national origin. The OSC also investigates charges that an employer has requested that an employee or job applicant establish employment eligibility and identity by presenting more or different documents than are required by law, rejected reasonably genuine-looking documents, or demanded a specific document such as a Alien Registration Card or "Green Card."

Q. What is the Age Discrimination In Employment Act?

A. The Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, as amended, 29 U.S.C. § 621, et seq. (the "ADEA"), prohibits discrimination in employment on the basis of age with respect to individuals who are 40 years of age or older. Congress has designated the EEOC as the federal agency responsible for investigating individual charges of discrimination under the ADEA. If you believe that you have been discriminated against in violation of the ADEA, you should contact the EEOC to find out whether you may file a charge.

Q. What is Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964?

A. Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, 42 U.S.C. § 2000d, et seq. ("Title VI"), prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color or national origin in any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance. Title VI confers primary responsibility for the enforcement of its provisions on those federal agencies extending financial assistance to the program or activity. The federal agency that extends the financial assistance can be contacted to find out how you may file a complaint under Title VI.

Q. What is the Rehabilitation Act of 1973?

A. Section 501 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, 29 U.S.C. §791, ("Section 501"), requires departments and agencies of the federal government to have an affirmative action program plan for the hiring, placement, and advancement of individuals with disabilities. The Department of Justice does not have authority under that Act to investigate the employment practices of other departments or agencies of the federal government. The procedure for filing a charge of employment discrimination against a department or agency of the federal government is to contact an equal employment opportunity officer at that agency who is authorized to receive and investigate such a charge.
Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, 29 U.S.C. §793, ("Section 503"), requires contractors with the federal government to take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with disabilities. The U.S. Department of Labor's Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) is the federal agency responsible for investigating individual charges of discrimination under Section 503.
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, 29 U.S.C. §794, ("Section 504"), prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability in any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance. Section 504 confers primary responsibility for the enforcement of its provisions on those federal agencies extending financial assistance to the program or activity.

Q. What is the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968?

A. Recipients of federal funding for law enforcement under the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, as amended, 42 U.S.C. § 3789d, are prohibited by that statute from discriminating on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, or sex in any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance. Primary responsibility for the enforcement of the anti-discrimination provision of the Act rests with the Office for Civil Rights of the Office of Justice Programs in the Department of Justice. This office may be reached at (202)307-0690.

Q. What is the Vietnam Era Veterans' Readjustment Assistance Act of 1974?

A. Section 4212 of the Vietnam Era Veterans' Readjustment Assistance Act of 1974, as amended, 38 U.S.C. §4212, ("VEVRAA"), requires contractors with the federal government to take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified disabled and Vietnam era veterans. The U.S. Department of Labor's Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) is the federal agency responsible for investigating individual charges of discrimination under the VEVRAA.

Q. What is the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act of 1994?

A. The Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act seeks to ensure that members of the uniformed services are entitled to return to their civilian employment upon completion of their active duty military service. The National Committee for Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve (ESGR)is an agency within the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Reserve Affairs. It was established in 1972 to promote cooperation and understanding between Reserve component members and their civilian employers and to assist in the resolution of conflicts arising from an employee's military commitment. Any questions regarding uniformed service employment rights should be addressed to the ESGR at (800) 336-4590.

Q. What is Executive Order 11246?

A. Executive Order 11246, as amended, prohibits discrimination in employment by contractors with the federal government on the basis of race, color, sex, religion, or national origin. The Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) of the U.S. Department of Labor is the federal agency responsible for investigating individual charges of discrimination under Executive Order 11246.