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General Education Program

General Education Program

Information for Faculty

 
 

2015-2016 Innovative Assignment Design Grant Awards

This year, the General Education Program (GEP) has teamed up with FGCUScholars: Think • Write • Discover (QEP) and the Lucas Center for Faculty Development to support faculty commitment to designing innovative assignments that address QEP and/or GEP learning outcomes.
 

Written Communication, Critical Thinking, and Information Literacy are the assessed learning outcomes for FGCUScholars: Think • Write • Discover. Written Communication, Critical Thinking, Quantitative Reasoning, and Intercultural Knowledge are FGCU’s General Education Program competencies. Faculty members proposed a range of assignment innovations to uniquely address, enhance, and measure student success in these outcomes/competencies.

The General Education Program would like to congratulate the following faculty members for winning 2015-2016 Innovative Assignment Design grants to support their work in General Education courses:

Pete Bishop, Department of Language & Literature, for the development of team lessons to help composition students understand course material

Daniel Paull, Department of Chemistry & Physics, for the development of lessons to engage students in understanding the cultural significance of organic chemistry

Tatiana Schuss, Department of Language & Literature, for the development of assignments that use cultural analysis as a way to support a deeper and more reflective understanding of French