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Promising Pathways

Promising Pathways

Keynote Speaker

 
 

 

 

Many Thanks to Our 2016 Keynote Speaker

We are still clapping!

 

 

 Dr. Lucina

 Dr. Lucina Uddin

After receiving a Ph.D. in cognitive neuroscience from the psychology department at UCLA in 2006, Dr. Uddin completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Child Study Center at NYU. For several years she worked as a faculty member in Psychiatry & Behavioral Science at the Stanford School of Medicine. She joined the psychology department at the University of Miami in 2014. Within a cognitive neuroscience framework, Dr. Uddin’s research combines functional connectivity analyses of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data and structural connectivity analyses of diffusion tensor imaging data to examine the organization of large-scale brain networks supporting flexible behaviors. Her current projects focus on understanding dynamic brain network interactions in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism. Dr. Uddin’s work has been published in the Journal of Neuroscience, Cerebral Cortex, JAMA Psychiatry, Biological Psychiatry, and PNAS.

 Dr. Uddin is interested  in the relationship between brain connectivity and cognition in typical and atypical development. Within a cognitive neuroscience framework, Dr. Uddin's research combines functional connectivity analyses of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data and structural connectivity analyses of diffusion tensor imaging data to examine the organization of large-scale brain networks supporting attention and social cognition. Her current projects focus on understanding dynamic network interactions underlying social information processing in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism.