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Florida Gulf Coast University
10501 FGCU Blvd S.
Fort Myers, FL. 33965-6565

Phone: (239) 590-1006
Fax:     (239) 590-1066

Press Release


FGCU Institute for Youth and Justice Studies Sponsors Child Watch Day, Hosts Visit to PACE Center in Immokalee

WHO     FGCU Institute for Youth and Justice Studies invites the media to attend

WHAT     First Child Watch Day, a look into "The PACE Center for Girls," a highly successful program for at-risk teenage girls. PACE is a Florida-based organization that provides gender-specific educational, therapeutic and character-building services to middle school and high school girls who are at high risk of developing lives of hopelessness, powerlessness and despair.

WHEN     8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Friday, March 17 including a bus trip at 10 a.m. to the PACE Center in Immokalee.

WHERE     Lee County Sheriff's Office Headquarters, 14750 Six Mile Cypress Pkwy.

WHY     The Institute for Youth and Justice Studies, in collaboration with Child Watch of Lee County, hopes to bring PACE's 20th Center for Girls to Lee County in 2006.

Child Watch chairman and Circuit Court Judge James H. Seals of the Juvenile Dependency Division said, "Girls are committing violent crimes, usually against people they know, love and believed they could trust, including their own mothers. Girls are more complicated young people than boys, their problems run deeper and wider, and they are harder to solve. They are physically, mentally and emotionally harmed and exploited in ways boys rarely encounter. I have personally witnessed hundreds of heartbreaking cases in juvenile court, and by far the ones that stand out most in my mind are girls' cases."

COST     Free

CONTACT     Director of the Institute for Youth and Justice Studies Sandra O'Brien at (239) 590-7835 or

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