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Nelson, Chad (PhD)

Assistant Professor
Department of Communication & Philosophy
Office: RH 0206
Phone: 239-590-1875
Email: cnelson@fgcu.edu

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Education

PhD - Media and Communication, Bowling Green State University
MA - Communication, Spring Arbor University
BA - Speech Education, Bob Jones University

Research and Teaching Interests

Dr. Nelson teaches and researches issues in rhetorical theory and criticism, critical intercultural communication, and social theory. His current research projects interrogate the rhetorical features of neoliberal capitalism in education policy; culture, race, and class in communicative practices of community; and the politics of restructuring the City of Detroit and its neighborhoods.

Courses Offered

Rhetoric of Social Movements
Rhetorical Criticism
History of Rhetorical Theory
Principles of Rhetoric and Argumentation
Special Topics: Rhetoric of Capitalism
Interracial/Intercultural Communication
Theories of Human Communication

Publications

  • Lee, E. Y. & Nelson, C. M. (2018). Can Detroiters dream again? The imagined dialectics of urban decline in Anthony Bourdain’s Parts Unknown—Detroit. Communication Studies, 69(4), 421-438. 
  • Meier, M. R. & Nelson, C. M. (2016). “Would you want your sister to marry one of them”: Whiteness, stand-up, and Lenny Bruce. In M. R. Meier & C. R. Schmitt (Eds.), Standing up, speaking out (pp. 92-110). New York: Routledge. 
  • Nelson, C. M. (2015). Resisting whiteness: Mexican American studies and rhetorical struggles for visibility. Journal of International and Intercultural Communication, 8(1), 63-80.