Programs

Program Overview

Events

Conversations in the Living RoomBrown bag luncheon series for the fall and spring terms.  Join us for conversations with our Teaching Excellence Award winners, engaging in difficult classroom dialogues, the IRB process, information about our students, utilizing technology in the classroom, and more! Be sure to check our Calendar of Events for the most up to date offerings.

Reflective Pedagogy Academies for early career faculty (less than 5 years of full-time university teaching) and established career faculty (more than 5 years of full-time university teaching). The academies will be developed with input from faculty members across campus to include topics of interest, develop collegiality among educators and support renewal for faculty members through a community of learners.

Summer Academies Our annual Course Design Academy is held in May over 6 half-days. We have added a follow-up Academy that focuses on course design in blended/hybrid classes. This is a life-changing experience! Work with colleagues across campus to design or re-design a course to provide significant learning experiences for your students. This year we will offer a third Course Design Academy for online teaching, a 4-day workshop on Teaching for Critical Thinking and our annual Academic Portfolio Workshop.

Book Clubs

Most Book Clubs meet for 3-5 sessions for informal discussions. All groups are led by a faculty member. Your personal copy will be provided by the Lucas Center. If you have an idea for a book club, send your idea to lucascenter@fgcu.edu.

Faculty Learning Communities

Faculty Learning Communities (FLCs) are informal groups of faculty members who meet on a regular basis to explore topics of common interest. Groups may discuss relevant articles and classroom examples. Some groups may pose questions for the group to answer or seek problem solving help. Other groups may develop research projects or begin scholarly writing groups.

Consultations: Dr. Reynolds and Dr. Greene are available for consultations, help in finding teaching resources, advice on whom to consult with on specific topics and a listening ear. 

Drop-in Visits: Stop by to talk, look at our resources, and have a soda and a snack! Located in Library 221.

Book Clubs

Book Clubs are scheduled for fall and spring terms, beginning in September. Faculty and staff members can sign up for one club and must commit to reading assigned pages and participating in every discussion. The Lucas Center provides a copy of the book for participants to keep.

A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas

by Warren Berger

In this groundbreaking book, journalist and innovation expert Warren Berger shows that one of the most powerful forces for igniting change in business and in our daily lives is a simple, under-appreciated tool one that has been available to us since childhood. Questioning deeply, imaginatively, 'beautifully' can help us identify and solve problems, come up with game-changing ideas, and pursue fresh opportunities.

Discussion facilitated by: Brenda Thomas
Dates and Times: Wednesdays from 2 – 3 pm // Sep. 4, Oct. 2, Oct. 30
Location: LIB 221

Pedagogy of the Oppressed

by Paulo Freire

Freire argues that the ignorance and lethargy of the poor are the direct result of the whole situation of economic, social and political domination. Through the right kind of education, avoiding authoritarian teacher-pupil models and based on the actual experiences of students and on continual shared investigation, every human being, no matter how impoverished or illiterate, can develop a new awareness of self which will free them to be than passive objects responding to uncontrollable change.

Discussion facilitated by: Carolyn Culbertson and Chad Nelson
Dates and Times: Mondays from 10 – 11 AM // Sep. 9, Sep. 30, Oct. 28
Location: LIB 225B Conference Room

iGen

by Jean Twenge

With generational divides wider than ever, parents, educators, and employers have an urgent need to understand today's rising generation of teens and young adults. Born in the mid-1990s to the mid-2000s and later, iGen is the first generation to spend their entire adolescence in the age of the smartphone. But technology is not the only thing that makes iGen distinct from every generation before them; they are also different in how they spend their time, how they behave, and in their attitudes toward religion, sexuality, and politics. A look at how today's members of iGen are vastly different from their Millennial predecessors, and from any other generation.

Discussion facilitated by: Lauren Strunk
Dates and Times: Mondays from 12 – 1 PM // Sep. 9, Oct. 7, Nov. 4
Location: LIB 221

Teach Students How to Learn

by Saundra McGuire

McGuire takes the reader sequentially through the ideas and strategies that students need to understand and implement. First, she demonstrates how introducing students to metacognition and Bloom’s Taxonomy reveals to them the importance of understanding how they learn and provides the lens through which they can view learning activities and measure their intellectual growth. Next, she presents a specific study system that can quickly empower students to maximize their learning. Then, she addresses the importance of dealing with emotion, attitudes, and motivation by suggesting ways to change students’ mindsets about ability and by providing a range of strategies to boost motivation and learning; finally, she offers guidance to faculty on partnering with campus learning centers. The methods she proposes do not require restructuring courses or an inordinate amount of time to teach. They can often be accomplished in a single session.

Discussion facilitated by: Rachel Campbell
Dates and Times: Tuesdays from 1:30 – 2:30 PM // Sep. 10, Oct. 1, Oct. 29
Location: LIB 221

OUTLIERS: THE STORY OF SUCCESS

by Malcolm Gladwell

In this stunning new book, Malcolm Gladwell takes us on an intellectual journey through the world of 'outliers' the best and the brightest, the most famous and the most successful. He asks the question: what makes high-achievers different? His answer is that we pay too much attention to what successful people are like, and too little attention to where they are from: that is, their culture, their family, their generation, and the idiosyncratic experiences of their upbringing. Along the way he explains the secrets of software billionaires, what it takes to be a great soccer player, why Asians are good at math, and what made the Beatles the greatest rock band. Brilliant and entertaining, Outliers is a landmark work that will simultaneously delight and illuminate.

Discussion facilitated by: Rachel Walter

Dates and Times: Thursdays from 1:30 – 2:30 PM // Sep. 12, Oct. 10, Oct. 31

Location: LIB 221

Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die

by Chip and Dean Heath

Chip and Dan Heath reveal the anatomy of ideas that stick and explain ways to make ideas stickier, such as applying the human scale principle, using the Velcro Theory of Memory, and creating curiosity gaps. Along the way, we discover that sticky messages of all kinds—from the infamous “kidney theft ring” hoax to a coach’s lessons on sportsmanship to a vision for a new product at Sony—draw their power from the same six traits. Made to Stick will transform the way you communicate. It’s a fast-paced tour of success stories (and failures): the Nobel Prize-winning scientist who drank a glass of bacteria to prove a point about stomach ulcers; the charities who make use of the Mother Teresa Effect; the elementary-school teacher whose simulation actually prevented racial prejudice.

Discussion facilitated by: Laura Frost

Dates and Times: Tuesdays from 1:30 – 2:30 PM // Sep. 17, Oct. 8, Nov. 5

Location: LIB 221

You Can Do Anything: The Surprising Power of a “Useless” Liberal Arts Education

by George Anders
Did you take the right classes in college? Will your major help you get the right job offers? For more than a decade, the national spotlight has focused on science and engineering as the only reliable choice for finding a successful post-grad career. Our destinies have been reduced to a caricature: learn to write computer code or end up behind a counter, pouring coffee. Quietly, though, a different path to success has been taking shape. In YOU CAN DO ANYTHING, George Anders explains the remarkable power of a liberal arts education - and the ways it can open the door to thousands of cutting-edge jobs every week.

Discussion facilitated by: Glen Whitehouse and Ashleigh Droz

Dates and Times: Mondays from 2:00 – 3:00 PM // Sep. 23, Oct. 7, Oct. 21, Nov. 4

Location: LIB 221

 

 

Academies 

Course Design Academy

The Course Design Academy (CDA) will meet for three full days in Summer A to explore learner-centered design principles, discuss ideas in small learning teams, and apply principles/concepts to courses and syllabi. You will exit with a new and improved fall course and tools to implement strategies and activities. Over the three days, we will continue to explore ways to “backward” design from what we want our students to know, identify effective ways to assess what our students know, explore ways to support significant long-term learning, and plug these ideas into your course.

Dates and Times: Spring 2020 dates are TBD
Location: LIB 221 (Lucas Center)

 

Blended Learning Academy

Blended Learning Academy explorers the design of hybrid courses over two full and two half-day sessions. This refers to a combination of face-to-face meetings and online sessions which when properly implemented can result in improved student success, satisfaction and retention. Grounded in several evidence-based theories, the experience will allow you to design or redesign a flipped, hybrid or otherwise blended course that promotes active, engaged and deep learning. Using the Backwards Design Model introduced in CDA, participants will choose, model and develop a variety of teaching and learning strategies and be exposed to various emerging technologies.

Dates, Times, and Locations: Spring 2020 Dates are TBD

 

Faculty Learning Communities

Faculty Learning Communities (FLCs) are informal groups of faculty members who meet on a regular basis to explore topics of common interest. Groups may discuss relevant articles and classroom examples. Some groups may pose questions for the group to answer or seek problem solving help. Other groups may develop research projects or begin scholarly writing groups.

Intentional Design: Design-based Strategies for Improved Teaching and Learning

Facilitated by Anne-Marie Bouché

REGISTER

All teachers are necessarily designers — we create a universe of material and immaterial “things” with which students have to interact. How well that interaction goes is, to a surprising extent, controlled by the design of those things, whether that means a whole course, a webpage or an individual learning object.

The term “design” encompasses a very broad range of useful concepts and processes that can be used to improve educational materials and outcomes. By applying research-based design principles, and by simply looking at our courses and course materials more critically with a design-sensitized eye, we can discover many creative ways to enhance usability, reduce errors and confusion, make course communication more efficient, improve outcomes, provide an enhanced learning environment for a wider range of students and increase student satisfaction.

This Faculty Learning Community is for those who would like to explore the application of basic design principles and concepts to teaching and learning. Using our own courses and course artifacts as examples, we will share creative ideas and insights and develop a community of practice with the goal of making our courses more functional and more engaging. The first two meetings will be devoted to foundational concepts: design thinking, the design process and an introduction to basic principles. Participants will then be invited to select specific aspects of their courses they would like to focus on in subsequent meetings. Some possible topics include: syllabus design, designing your Canvas website; using design to improve assignment instructions; using visual assets effectively.

Week 1: What does “design” have to offer to teachers? Basic design concepts; “design thinking” and design process; “accessible” and “universal” design in education.

Week 2: Evaluating courses and learning objects from a design standpoint. Please bring at least one example or problem from your own practice that provides a problem or a solution that illustrates the application of one or more of the design principles explained in the readings below:

Donald Norman. The Design of Everyday Things (introduction)

William Lidwell, Kritina Holden and Jill Butler. Universal Principles of Design (excerpts)

Weeks 3-5: Specific topics to be determined by the group.

Integrating information literacy

Facilitated by Heather Snapp

REGISTER

This faculty learning community is designed to help you integrate information literacy more intentionally into your assignments and courses. Learn about best practices, discuss strategies, and share and gain ideas from each other. Attendees will create or modify a new or existing assignment or course with the goal of incorporating information literacy objectives. This FLC is facilitated by Lucas Faculty Fellow Heather Snapp, Frist Year Experience and Outreach Librarian.

Exploring Undergraduate research as a mentoring opportunity

Facilitated by Greg Boyce

REGISTER

Undergraduate research is a high impact teaching practice that provides a unique mentoring opportunity for students and faculty. The Council of Undergraduate Research goes as far as to state “We believe that undergraduate research is the pedagogy of the 21st century.” In this faculty learning community, we will discuss best practices, design appropriate level projects, identify internal and external funding opportunities, and share what works best in providing transformative experiences to our undergraduate students. New cross-discipline collaborations may also arise from attending this FLC. We will also have guests from various fields of study who will briefly share their experience followed by group discussion and Q&A. Research is broadly defined as seeking new knowledge and all disciplines (including art, business, engineering, entrepreneurship, humanities, nursing, sciences) are welcome and encouraged to participate.

Lucas Fellows

Photo of Miles Mancini
Miles Mancini
Miles will focus on how to re-invent and reinvigorate the large lecture style classes by creating an active learning environment.

mmancini@fgcu.edu or 239-590-7442

 

Photo of Anne-Marie Bouche
Anne-Marie Bouche
Anne-Marie will be exploring how principles of intuitive, accessible and universal design can be applied to courses to support student success.

ambouche@fgcu.edu or 239-590-1467

 

Photo of Heather Snapp
Heather Snapp
Heather is available to work with faculty to incorporate best practices for information literacy objectives into new or existing course assignments.

hsnapp@fgcu.edu or 239-745-4224

 

Photo of Greg Boyce
Greg Boyce
Greg's aim is to aid faculty, regardless of discipline or career stage, to engage students in effective research experiences.

gboyce@fgcu.edu or 239-590-1471

 

2019 Southwest Florida Symposium on Teaching and Learning: Promoting Inclusion and Belonging In and Out of the Classroom

This year’s Southwest Florida Symposium on Teaching and Learning (formerly Lucas Symposium) is a collaboration between FGCU’s Lucas Center and FSW’s Teaching and Learning Center that will focus on the actions we as members of an educational community take to promote inclusion and belonging in and out of the classroom. Faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend.

Dates: 1/22/19 at FGCU and 1/23/19 FSW

Times: Opening workshop from 9am-11am and Interactive Presentations from 11am-3pm. Lunch will be provided. There will also be an open reception with the presenters from 3-4pm. These times are applicable on both dates at both locations.
Questions? Contact lucascenter@fgcu.edu or tlc@fsw.edu

New Faculty Academy

College/Department: Lucas Center for Faculty Development

 
Participants: All new resident faculty hires at FGCU with less than two years of university teaching experience (not including graduate assistantships, teaching assistantships or adjunct teaching) are required to enroll.  Other new faculty may enroll, space permitting.
 
Faculty Load: Successfully completing this course is an expectation of employment. This course will be completed in lieu of service during the semester new faculty are enrolled in this course. 
 
Course Description and Rationale: Becoming an effective educator takes more than just content knowledge. It takes more than merely implementing a syllabus and it doesn’t happen in a linear way. It’s hard work, reiterative and can be a life-altering experience ranging from intellectual highs to emotional lows. Teaching and learning happen within a social environment and demand a relationship between you and your students. It’s a learning process that never ends.
 
Most professors have not had any course work in teaching and learning but are expected to just "know" how to teach well. Some professors are gifted with exceptional people skills and make their way in the classroom with those gifts. Others try different techniques or flounder around trying to find ways to reach their students. For many, some immersion in learning theory, course design, behavior management and reflection makes learning how to teach a more successful endeavor.
 
This course is for new (and relatively new) educators at FGCU.  It is built upon the belief that while no one can make one a better teacher, new faculty members can be given the tools to develop their own “teacher persona” through reading, discussing, reflecting, and practicing.  Along the way they have opportunities for feedback from the instructor, other faculty members and their peers.  The goal is to equip our new colleagues with skills that will set them on the path of teaching effectiveness.

This course is divided into 4 units:

  1. Designing a Course
  2. Teaching Strategies
  3. Assessing Learning
  4. My Academic Life

NFA is offered during the fall term on Friday mornings from 9 AM  - 11:30 AM in LIB 221.

Mentor Coach Program

What is a Mentor Coach?

A Mentor Coach is a resident faculty member at FGCU who has been here for at least three years or who is at the rank of Associate Professor or higher. 
Faculty members who have successfully completed the Course Design Academy will be given preference as Mentor Coaches because of their work in best practice pedagogy. 
Mentor Coaches have skills in many areas but do not profess to be a “guru” about all things but rather are a “coach” who can support early career faculty members and help a new faculty member find the resources either on-campus or in the wider academic community to be a successful faculty member.
Although these mentors will be expected to primarily support the new faculty members with classroom pedagogy, they may be called upon for advice and support in other areas.  A Mentor Coach may not be from the same discipline or department as the mentee; however, the mentor will help the mentee find the advice and resources they need.

For application information, contact the Lucas Center at lucascenter@fgcu.edu.

Peer Observation of Teaching

Purpose

Formative Feedback

Process

At the Lucas Center we view peer observation of teaching (POT) as an effective mechanism for assisting faculty to achieve their professional goals related to the art and science of teaching. Research strongly suggests that POT (being observed and observing others) can provide an opportunity for collegial conversations about teaching, while also enabling reflective practice and providing opportunities for the provision of developmental advice (Drew et al., 2016; Hammersley-Fletcher & Orsmond, 2005; Hendry & Oliver, 2012; Pressick-Kilborn & te Riele, 2008).

In order to most closely align POT with the mission, vision, and goals of the Lucas Center, we employ a coaching model that conceptualizes POT as a formative, collaborative, and developmental series of activities conducted between a Lucas Center representative and a faculty member who wishes to engage in a dialogue about her/his teaching (in contrast to a summative, more formally evaluative approach used by some institutions). In this spirit of mutuality, all observers commit to opening their classrooms to observation by those they observe.

Despite our intention to enact a process that is useful and fulfilling for both the faculty member being observed and the observer, we acknowledge that vulnerability and concerns about judgment are inherent in the process. Therefore, we ensure that confidentiality is built into the POT procedure, and written reports are provided directly and only to the observed faculty members when requested. Peer observers are encouraged to share their experiences of and feelings about being observed in their own classes in order to foster trust and mutuality in the observation process.

The Lucas Center will not provide letters or reports attesting to the quality or effectiveness of one’s teaching based on a single observation. However, when faculty members provide a clear set of learning objectives for a given lesson during the pre-observation meeting, observers can comment on the extent to which those objectives have been achieved.

Procedure

Faculty wishing to schedule an observation should follow these steps.

  1. At least three weeks before the class session you would like observed, contact the Lucas Center to ensure an observer is available and to arrange a pre-observation consultation.
  2. Email your observer the course syllabus and any materials you believe would help her/him better understand your goals for the class and how you intend to accomplish them.
  3. Attend a brief (typically 15 – 30 minutes) pre-observation meeting, during which you will a) discuss your general approach to teaching and any specific elements of your lesson (e.g., teaching methods, style, student engagement) about which you would like feedback and b) learn about the observer’s approach to conducting an observation.
  4. Within a week of the observed class, participate in a post-observation meeting, during which you and the observer will discuss your respective perceptions of the class, and the observer will provide feedback and suggestions (often including detailed descriptive notes) typically in direct response to the areas of focus discussed in the pre-observation meeting. 

We strongly believe that peer observation of teaching can play a valuable role for all faculty who engage in a reflective process of professional improvement. We hope to visit many of your classrooms and encourage you to observe the teaching of Lucas Center personnel at your convenience.

Trained Peer observers

  • Menaka Navaratna

  • Alayde Barbosa

  • Angel Taylor

  • Tatiana Schuss

  •  Brenda Thomas

  •  Lynn Jaffe

  •  Erik Insko

  •  Tanya Huffman

  • Roderick Rolle

Early / Mid-Career Academy

Early CAREER ACADEMY

Climbing the Ladder to Successful Teaching, Scholarship and Service

Since the inception of the New Faculty Academy, we have had requests to develop similar experiences for faculty members who have been at FGCU for some time. The Lucas Center for Faculty Development has developed an annual academy to support faculty at early career (Instructor I, Assistant Professor, Assistant Librarian). The topics we cover and the tools we will provide will prepare, lead, guide, and challenge you to define your goals for the next 3-5 years, to support the attainment of your goals and identify how to integrate the three areas of faculty work with your personal and professional life. Imagining what your career can look like will prepare you to be an agent for your own growth and development. We hope you join fellow faculty members as they explore and plan their future career path.

Dates: Spring 2020 Dates are TBD
Time: 9am - 11:30am
Location: LIB 221 (Lucas Center)

 

Established Career Academy

Established Career Academy

Managing your Career as Running a Marathon: Reflection & Transformation

Since the inception of the New Faculty Academy, we have had requests to develop similar experiences for faculty members who have been at FGCU for some time. The Lucas Center for Faculty Development has developed an annual academy to support faculty at established career (Instructor II & III, Associate Professor/Associate Librarian, Professor/University Librarian). The goal of this academy is to maintain instructional vitality, explore the role of advocacy and leadership, and to develop ways to engage in the reciprocal nature of mentoring. You will participate in a community of scholars and collaborate with a colleague across disciplines.

Dates: Spring 2020 Dates are TBD
Time: 9am - 11:30am
Location: LIB 221 (Lucas Center)